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Topic: BOB DYLAN - Modern Times Appreciation Thread Return to archive Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
30th August 2006 06:47 AM
Gazza anyone watch the DVD yet? They managed to edit out that "Soy Bomb" wanker from the Love Sick performance from the Grammys!

In one way its good that he doesnt get any publicity, but at the same time, Bob's facial reaction to the stage invasion is priceless. Anyone else would have freaked or had a seizure, but he plays on like a trooper
[Edited by Gazza]
30th August 2006 07:12 AM
Factory Girl Hey, I bought MT at Best Buy and got a bonus CD for free!

Is the extra dvd worth the extra $10?

-----------------------------------------------------------
On another Note--

Martha!

Please send some luck & peace my way!

Thank you very kindly,

FG!
30th August 2006 07:21 AM
Gazza
quote:
Factory Girl wrote:
Hey, I bought MT at Best Buy and got a bonus CD for free!

Is the extra dvd worth the extra $10?



I wouldnt go that far. Its just promo videos of 4 songs. I doubt theres much difference in price between the regular and bonus editions. The clips are nice though, and quite funny in parts (where else would you get to see Bob Dylan juggle for Chrissakes..)
30th August 2006 08:00 AM
justinkurian I'm digging the new album. I'm surprised he didn't play a new song at last night's gig.

Here is the new iTunes ad:
http://www.apple.com/ipod/ads/dylan/
30th August 2006 08:05 AM
RollingstonesUSA Music Video for "When The Deal Goes Down"

http://music.aol.com/artist/bob-dylan/4147/video
30th August 2006 08:09 AM
Factory Girl
quote:
Gazza wrote:


I wouldnt go that far. Its just promo videos of 4 songs. I doubt theres much difference in price between the regular and bonus editions. The clips are nice though, and quite funny in parts (where else would you get to see Bob Dylan juggle for Chrissakes..)



Gazza, for some ungodly reason Best Buy is charging $19.99 for the dvd edition. Those vultures...

I've seen Bob juggle in "Blood in My Eyes" video, which I love. Thanks for the info.
30th August 2006 08:35 AM
justinkurian From USA Today:

Dylan's art is forever a-changin'
By Edna Gundersen, USA TODAY

SANTA MONICA, Calif. — Bob Dylan is not in the mood to reminisce.

"There's no nostalgia on this record," Dylan insists, disputing critics who hear bygone times on Modern Times, which arrives today. "Pining for the past doesn't interest me."

Mining his past, however, is a boomer preoccupation. Last year, Martin Scorsese's No Direction Home, accompanied by a soundtrack and companion scrapbook of memorabilia, traced Dylan's early rise. It followed 2004's autobiography, Chronicles: Volume 1, and the sixth edition of Dylan's Bootleg series. An upcoming biopic and Broadway musical also raid Dylan's back pages.

Yet Dylan did not sew up 20th-century glory to sit in the grandstands now. The '60s trailblazer who reinvented pop music and revolutionized songwriting is still a groundbreaking artist at 65, according to critics dazzled by Modern Times, Dylan's 31st studio album and third in a career renaissance launched by 1997's Time Out of Mind. Asserts Rolling Stone: "There is no precedent in rock 'n' roll for the territory Dylan is opening."

In earthy blues, ragtime and rockabilly, the language shifts from mischievous to mysterious and romantic to rueful as Dylan surveys a crumbling world in doubt-shrouded songs about love and vengeance, faith and fate.

The 10 songs, recorded with his touring band in January in New York, "are in my genealogy," he says. "I had no doubts about them. I tend to overwrite stuff, and in the past I probably would have left it all in. On this, I tried my best to edit myself, and let the facts speak. You can easily get a song convoluted. That didn't happen. Maybe I've had records like this before, but I can't remember when."

Perched on a chair in a beachside hotel suite, Dylan fervently discusses his new music, smoothly evades unwelcome topics (politics) and dispenses disdain slyly. Asked to elaborate on today's hit-driven environment, he cracks a broad grin and says: "I don't want to disparage anyone in pop music. I'm sure it's all good. I'm sure people are thriving."

Modern's pared lyrics and spirited music evolved naturally, with Dylan never in fevered pursuit.

"The obsessiveness about songwriting is far away from me," he says. "I can let it go for long periods. I don't need the songs. When you're younger, you keep writing so you have them to play. After a certain point, you can't play it all, anyway. It gets harder to find a purpose to do something different.

"What I have to do is space out and almost hypnotize myself, without drugs, of course," he says with a laugh. "Those are my best songs, when I'm not really conscious. Once my motive is established, it's up to me to find the ideal terminology, vocabulary, rhythms to work it out. I don't like writing songs where I have to come up with a far-fetched poetic thing and find a melody later. I've done that, and it doesn't work that well for me."

He completed 14 or 15 songs last September, shelved those he considered "lukewarm" and pruned others. Tattered hymn Workingman Blues #2 pays homage to Merle Haggard, who has pledged to write a Blowin' in the Wind sequel, Dylan says.

Writing poignant waltz When the Deal Goes Down "demands all your attention," he says. "There's no song you're listening to that's influencing it. The song you wrote before is irrelevant. All you can do is hang on and hope you do it justice."

The initially nettlesome Nettie Moore "troubled me the most, because I wasn't sure I was getting it right," Dylan says. "Finally, I could see what the song is about. This is coherent, not just a bunch of random verses. I knew I wanted to record this. I was pretty hyped up on the melodic line."

Shifting from playful romps to haunted ballads, Dylan encounters angels and lazy sluts, floods and the plague, a blind horse, a sick mule and Alicia Keys, his quest in Thunder on the Mountain. He never met the R&B ingénue but admired her performance at the 2001 Grammys. He says: "I liked her a whole lot. People stay in your mind for one reason or another."

The unusually accessible Modern still leads into dark mazes, and Dylan isn't handing out flashlights.

"Words go by awfully quick," he says. "Maybe it's hard for a listener to comprehend them all. Maybe they don't want to. I couldn't say what these songs add up to, any more than I can say what the rest of my songs add up to. They mean what they say they mean. They strike you where you can feel it, and you can feel what they mean. With this kind of music, you want to move somebody, and you have to move yourself first."

Still making planet waves

Dylan's undiminished authority springs from supernatural talent, says friend and admirer Tom Petty, stating simply: "He's better than all of us. Backing him in the '80s had a huge effect on our band. Bob has a spontaneity that comes from folk or even the best jazz artists. It's very fresh and alive. We learned if the song is durable and good, you can approach it a lot of ways. He gets better and better. He's had his patchy periods, but we all hang with him because we know any day he might write the best thing he's ever done."

Dylan's evolution runs counter to the industry's growing reliance on forged images, synthetic sounds and boundless technology. When recording spare folk albums Good as I Been to You (1992) and World Gone Wrong (1993) in his garage, an engineer suggested he pin a microphone to each guitar string.

"It was the height of insanity," Dylan says. "There are so many layers on records today. There are so many tracks in studios, and producers think they have to use them. This is no art form. It's just corporate sound. Because there's very little there, you have to dress it up with all these tracks. For me, everything has to have a purpose or it should get lost.

"The beat stuff people play, that's as far away from real rhythm as the sun is from the moon. Those beats make people pose, but they don't make people move or change their lives. They're low-key and laid-back, and that's what popular music has come to. Even metal is ponderous."

He stops himself and chuckles.

"I hate to go on my soapbox about the recording industry. I'm sure there's a lot of good songs getting recorded today, but I can't hear them. I'm just hearing buzz. There's a superficiality to it which might be successful, but people forget about it real quick and go on to the next one instantly. I don't want to be a performer like that."

Dylan aims to tell a truthful story and nourish it on stage. Keeping it real doesn't mean copping ideas from CNN or responding to the conflict du jour, which is why you won't find an updated Masters of War on Modern Times.

"Didn't Neil Young do that?" he jokes, referring to the rocker's recent anti-war disc. "What more is there to say? What's funny about the Neil record, when I heard Let's Impeach the President, I thought it was something old that had been lying around. I said, 'That's crazy, he's doing a song about Clinton?' "

Topical songs "are not my thing. I'm not good at it. Stuff you read in papers is secondhand information. My stuff is my own experience."

Contradicting a label report, he doesn't regard Modern as the last in a trilogy, because Grammy-winning Time Out of Mind, produced by Daniel Lanois, is an odd fit.

"I had no band," Dylan says. "I didn't pick half the musicians. It was a mystery to me how I was going to get anything out of those sessions. It was just a mess. There was hardly any communication."

Under the pseudonym Jack Frost, Dylan reluctantly produced 2001's Love and Theft and Modern. He says the only producer he ever felt comfortable with was "Bumps" Blackwell, who guided early Little Richard and Sam Cooke records and co-produced 1981's Shot of Love.

"He made simple records and understood my stuff inside out. A producer should be raised on the same kind of music. When I bring in a song, it's not that well known — to me or anyone else. How can I expect to show someone the intricacies and nuances?"

A freewheeling free agent

Dylan waxes ecstatic about his current sidemen, yet he's a defiant solo artist who dismisses the concept of bands as little gangs.

"The performers who changed my life were individuals," he says. "They didn't conform to any sense of reality but their own. The last performer who stood up to be counted as an original is Bruce Springsteen, I think. Individuals move me, not mobs. People with originality, whether it's Hector, Achilles, Ted Turner or Jerry Lee Lewis or Hank Williams."

That explains why he has been drawn to boxing since high school.

"Almost everyone else played a team sport," he says. "I liked boxing because it was just you and you alone. And you didn't get hurt. It seemed like you got mangled in football and hit in the head with baseballs. Team sports were not my cup of tea.

"I took a professional opponent on the road with me, and I'd box in the afternoons to focus my mind. This guy could walk across a football field on his hands. I kept it up. Still do, as much as I can. I'd like to race a car around a track. Those guys are really alone too."

Dylan is a busy loner. As he wraps up his third tour of minor-league baseball parks, he's planning a fall arena tour that starts Oct. 11 and enjoying his weekly DJ stint on XM satellite radio. He has yet to carve out time to write the second Chronicles book.

He's only peripherally entangled in other enterprises. Todd Haynes is directing I'm Not There, a Dylan biopic with a half dozen actors portraying the bard at various stages. Twyla Tharp plumbed his catalog for Broadway-bound dance musical The Times They Are A-Changin'. He consented to both projects without much hand-wringing.

"A lot of people are very protective of what they've got and rightfully so," he says. "But so much has been done to me and to my work, and it's been exploited on such grandiose levels with no thought of me, that you get to a point where you don't care anymore. Anything that comes your way is better than somebody taking it their way.

"I don't care about image. I don't have any image problem. It matters not to me which commercials or movies or TV shows they're in or not in or how many are being sung in clubs or school plays."

No ranking of best artists, songs or songwriters fails to name him. He topped Paste magazine's list of greatest living songwriters in June, then led the August issue's roster of greatest dead songwriters, because he'd obviously be there eventually, anyway. Always ahead of his time. Dylan laughs at this news. Once hungry for immortality, he no longer sweats his place in the pantheon. He doesn't need to.

"I got past that," he says. "Posterity has to take care of itself. All that's important in the present time is: Do the songs work for me when I play? I can't get away with singing cover songs like Rod Stewart. Nobody's going to buy it, first of all. I love those songs, but I have to play my songs, and they have to work in a crash-and-burn kind of way. There's more to my music than the lyrics. You would only know that if you have open ears and an open mind, and you give me a clear channel."

He laughs. "Give me an unpaved road to your heart."


[Edited by justinkurian]
30th August 2006 08:50 AM
Nasty Habits I can't recommend the vinyl version highly enough. Gatefold jacket and printed inner sleeves that were obviously pretty well thought out, 180 gram vinyl, deep grooves. The sound is spectacular. Going from MP3's straight to well mastered vinyl was quite the shock. And (thank heavens) no lyric sheet.

I just cannot get over that Nettie Moore song. So unbelievably sad and beautiful.

30th August 2006 08:51 AM
Gazza
quote:
Factory Girl wrote:


Gazza, for some ungodly reason Best Buy is charging $19.99 for the dvd edition. Those vultures...

I've seen Bob juggle in "Blood in My Eyes" video, which I love. Thanks for the info.



Filmed in Camden High Street, too. Just beside all the best bootleg stalls in London!

Also the source of one of my favourite Dylan stories ever, when Andrew Muir (editor of the now-defunct Dylan fanzine 'Homer the slut') got to meet Dylan just after he'd filmed the video and got him to autograph his magazine. See here for the story :

http://www.punkhart.com/dylan/articles/h10meet.html
[Edited by Gazza]
30th August 2006 08:58 AM
Gazza Great interview, Justin. Thanks. Edna Gunderson always seems to get right to the heart of Bob. Liked his comment on Springsteen too.

And as for Tom Petty's comment - it speaks for all of us who have stuck with Dylan down the years, through thick and thin...

"He's had his patchy periods, but we all hang with him because we know any day he might write the best thing he's ever done."

[Edited by Gazza]
30th August 2006 08:59 AM
Gazza
quote:
Nasty Habits wrote:
I can't recommend the vinyl version highly enough. Gatefold jacket and printed inner sleeves that were obviously pretty well thought out, 180 gram vinyl, deep grooves. The sound is spectacular. Going from MP3's straight to well mastered vinyl was quite the shock. And (thank heavens) no lyric sheet.

I just cannot get over that Nettie Moore song. So unbelievably sad and beautiful.





I havent bought vinyl in decades, but I might make an exception in this case
30th August 2006 09:04 AM
Madafaka A masterpiece, without doubts!

I need to know two little things:

How many stars give the US Rolling Stone to this cd?

What's on the dvd edition?

TIA!
30th August 2006 09:10 AM
PartyDoll MEG
quote:
Madafaka wrote:
A masterpiece, without doubts!

I need to know two little things:

How many stars give the US Rolling Stone to this cd?

What's on the dvd edition?

TIA!

Rolling Stone gave Modern Times 5 Stars!!

Gazza can tell you what is on DVD ..I am at work. If it is like iTunes, it includes 5 videos.


[Edited by PartyDoll MEG]
30th August 2006 09:24 AM
Madafaka Thank you MEG!


Check this out: http://cgi.ebay.com/BOB-DYLAN-MODERN-TIMES-JAPAN-CD-BONUS-DVD-OBI_W0QQitemZ230023581975QQihZ013QQcategoryZ307QQtcZphotoQQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
30th August 2006 09:28 AM
Gazza On my copy :

Blood In My Eye - promo video 1993
Love Sick - live performance, Grammys 25.2.98
Things Have Changed - promo video 2000
Cold Irons Bound - full performance of the song, as seen in edited form in the film "Masked & Anonymous", 2002

Meg - see that link in my reply to Factory Girl above. Thats the story I was telling you about.
[Edited by Gazza]
30th August 2006 09:38 AM
Madafaka Thank you Gazza!
There's a fragment of Cold Irons Bound: http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Times-Deluxe-/dp/B000GRTQSE/ref=dp_return_2/103-4178677-3207849?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music
30th August 2006 09:38 AM
PartyDoll MEG
quote:
Gazza wrote:
On my copy :

Blood In My Eye - promo video 1993
Love Sick - live performance, Grammys 25.2.98
Things Have Changed - promo video 2000
Cold Irons Bound - full performance of the song, as seen in edited form in the film "Masked & Anonymous", 2002

Meg - see that link in my reply to Factory Girl above. Thats the story I was telling you about.
[Edited by Gazza]

Thanks, Gazza....always sooooo thorough!!
30th August 2006 09:45 AM
Madafaka Sorry, there's not "a fragment", is the whole song
30th August 2006 12:24 PM
Martha
quote:
Factory Girl wrote:
Hey, I bought MT at Best Buy and got a bonus CD for free!

Is the extra dvd worth the extra $10?

-----------------------------------------------------------
On another Note--

Martha!

Please send some luck & peace my way!

Thank you very kindly,

FG!



You got it darlin'!

Extras all 'round!

:-)
30th August 2006 12:28 PM
Martha
quote:
Sir Stonesalot wrote:
Martha...

I got a date with Bob on Sept. 3rd.

And, as of 10am tomorrow, another date with him on Nov. 18th. The Raconteurs open. It's the last date on the tour...think Jack might do another duet with Bob?

I can only hope...



I am praying for the second duet in history...with you in the front row watching.....oh yeah!

I'm so glad to hear you are catchin' 2 gigs. Is Flea goin?

I am doin' the last 2 ballpark gigs and then Denver if I can get tickets...the presale started today and I need to check that next.

xxoo,
Martha
30th August 2006 12:30 PM
Martha
quote:
Gazza wrote:


Thats two offers in 24 hours, Martha. Cant turn that down. Fair enough. With tongues, then...



Damn right!

I am brushing my teeth, gums and tongue right now!

Pucker UP!

:-)
30th August 2006 12:39 PM
Martha Ok...it's on and I am begging....if ANYONE has the presale password to buy Dylan tix (password given through iTunes) PLEASE PM me or email me: amelodylan@yahoo.com

I will be eternally grateful for help with this.

Thank you in advance.

peace,
Martha
30th August 2006 02:04 PM
Lazy Bones
quote:
Martha wrote:
Ok...it's on and I am begging....if ANYONE has the presale password to buy Dylan tix (password given through iTunes) PLEASE PM me or email me: amelodylan@yahoo.com

I will be eternally grateful for help with this.

Thank you in advance.

peace,
Martha




usually they appear on the site the morning of the pre-sale. keep your eyes peeled there. at least they used to. i haven't bought tickets during the last few legs so i'm not 100% sure.

i'm trying for both london and toronto shows. those pre-sales start tuesday.
30th August 2006 02:06 PM
glencar Is the DVD worth buying?
30th August 2006 02:07 PM
glencar
quote:
Gazza wrote:


I havent bought vinyl in decades, but I might make an exception in this case

Someone very nice treated me to ABB's vinyl edition. Very tasty!
30th August 2006 02:26 PM
Factory Girl
quote:
Gazza wrote:
On my copy :

Blood In My Eye - promo video 1993
Love Sick - live performance, Grammys 25.2.98
Things Have Changed - promo video 2000
Cold Irons Bound - full performance of the song, as seen in edited form in the film "Masked & Anonymous", 2002

Meg - see that link in my reply to Factory Girl above. Thats the story I was telling you about.
[Edited by Gazza]



How can I get Bob's video from the Victoria Secret Commercial? TIA!
30th August 2006 02:28 PM
Gazza I saw it on You Tube a while back. If you do a search with the appropriate keywords, you should get it OK
30th August 2006 02:29 PM
Factory Girl
quote:
glencar wrote:
Is the DVD worth buying?



If all the videos are virgin to your eyes, yes.

If you've seen/had the videos, no.
30th August 2006 02:34 PM
glencar Nothing's virgin at my age...
30th August 2006 02:38 PM
Factory Girl
quote:
glencar wrote:
Nothing's virgin at my age...



That is a line worthy of Bob himself.
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