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Topic: Camera/B-Stage Dilema... Return to archive
07-05-02 12:38 PM
MidnightRambler Hey everyone,

I was hoping someone could give me some words of wisdom on this dilema:

My ticket for the United Center is smack dab right in front of the B-stage, first row as a matter of fact. I plan to bring in my little point and shoot zoom-lens camera.

The problem is from what I've seen like on the Hartford '99 videos, there are several security men surrounding the B-stage---and to add to that displeasure----they are FACING YOU!!!!

What am I to do?

Risk bringing in the camera, use the flash and take some good pictures?

OR

Risk bringing in the camera, TURNING OFF my flash, and end up w/ some out of focus pictures?

Any help would be great!
07-05-02 12:42 PM
scope With all the new security at all events, just getting the camera in may be a problem. I would go with a disposible camera. Some of them actually take decent pictures, and if it does get confiscated, you're not out a camera.
07-05-02 01:11 PM
Maxlugar How do you know there will even be a B stage much less it's position?

Is the B stage a given for this tour? I hope so but I've not heard anything.
07-05-02 01:13 PM
MidnightRambler Yeah, if you look at the seating chart for the United Center, a second stage extends from the main stage. Is it named the "B-stage"? Who knows? But, that's where I'm sitting! "B-stage" or not!
07-05-02 03:24 PM
swapwoodfortaylor No No! Don't use a flash. You will get better pics without BUT you must use a fairly high speed film.
07-05-02 03:32 PM
MidnightRambler Hey swapwoodfortaylor,

I'm glad you bring up this issue. I was INTENDING on NOT using flash, but I took some test-shots w/ out flash, and all the pictures turned out blurry, and out of focus.

Does it have to do w/ the zoom lens? You think it's much more sensitive w/ out the flash?
07-05-02 08:56 PM
Stonesthrow Midnight-- There are (at least) two things to consider to get good quality pictures. The first is the shutter speed. The higher the speed, the better you are able to freeze action so that it is not blurry. For that reason, it is also more forgiving if you do not have a steady hand when snapping the picture. Typical shutter speed is 1/50 of a second, top speed is usually 1/1000.

The second is the f/stop which is an indicator of how much light the camera's iris allows the film to see. The lower the f/stop number the more light is allowed in. A problem with lower f/stop numbers is that the depth of field (focus) area is reduced. If you are trying to film a constantly moving target, like Mick in low light, getting a shot both properly focused and exposed will prove difficult. Connected to the f/stop question is the film's speed. If the environment is low light, then a higher film speed is pretty much essential. Most film speed is ASA 100, 200, or 400. As posted earlier, a higher film speed may be necessary. For extremely low light situations, ASA 1600 or even 3200 is recommended. It is most unlikely that any disposable cameras would have film that that sort.

The likelihood of getting good pictures with disposable cameras is slight, even if you can smuggle them in. Using your own camera will give you a better chance of success. However, do you want to risk its being confiscated? You would have a better chance with the technology of a digital camera but the risk/reward ratio of possibly having it confiscated may not be suitable for you.


07-05-02 09:15 PM
MidnightRambler Thank you, Stonesthrow for that very informative post!
I am indeed, very torn as to what to do. I really don't want to use a disposeable...

Unfortunatley, my camera doesn't have an aperture reading or f/stop controls because it's not an SLR camera but just a point and shoot. I intend on using 800 speed film. With the test runs I've taken, I've also used 800 speed and purposely took pictures indoors, w/ out flash, and they came in quite blurry. (Note: some pictures were close-ups using the zoom lens)

Choices, choices...
[Edited by MidnightRambler]
07-05-02 09:53 PM
littleredrooster Bring the camera, I am going to bring my Canon ELF.
I was able to shoot some great pix from right against the B stage. Also caught Woody's guitar pick from Midnight Rambler. I'm also going to bring my Canon Power Shot S40 digital with 4 128MB chips to the Aragon.
I think that ASA 800 would be too fast, remember the stage lights wiil be bright if you are close! You run the risk of severe white out in your shots.
Email me if you want some pictures sent to you, just some examples of No Security B stage photos and auto telephoto shots from Voodoo.
When all the flashes start to pop, you'll kick yourself in the ass for NOT bringing it!
It's gonna be GREAT!
Check out my avatar from Vancouver Voodoo Lounge, NO FLASH USED!
littleredrooster@charter.net
[Edited by littleredrooster]
07-06-02 05:29 AM
Stonesthrow Midnight-- If you have any Stones concert footage on tape or DVD, play it in a darkened room and take photos of the TV screen. That might be a good indicator of whether bringing your camera to the concert would be worthwhile. If you know where your position will be relative to the stage, finding video footage that approximates that distance, if possible, will also help in the experiment. BTW, I forgot to add in the previous post that, compared to the 50 mm portrait type lens, telephoto lenses do cut down on the amount of light that the film will see. To compensate for that loss of light, you must open up the iris (f/stop to a lower number), use a faster shutter speed, and/or use higher speed film. Good luck.
07-06-02 06:59 AM
luxury1 Mick uses disposables from the B-stage--good enough for him......


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